Investors
P: 1800 658 404
View full details
Financial advisers
Contact your state account manager or our client services.
View full details
Shopping Centres
For leasing, casual leasing and brand solutions enquiries
Contact Us
Connect with us to stay up to date with news and updates.

LinkedIn

Take the good times with the ‘Bard’


In times of financial turmoil, returning to the classics can remind investors to take a long-term perspective and seek opportunities to focus on their financial goals.

In the midst of heightened anxiety over the possibility of another financial crisis and market turmoil, 2016 marks the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death. While most people don’t pick up Shakespeare’s plays when they’re looking for investment advice, William Shakespeare (also known as the Bard of Avon) did write frequently about money matters:

“How poor are they that have not patience! What wound did ever heal but by degrees?” – Iago in Othello in Act 2, Scene 3. Or in plain English: patience pays off.

“Neither a borrower nor a lender be; For loan oft loses both itself and friend, And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry.” – Polonius in Hamlet Act I, Scene 3. In other words, don’t spend money you don’t have.

“Foul-cankering rust the hidden treasure frets, But gold that’s put to use more gold begets.” – Venus and Adonis, a poem. Or more simply: Don’t put your money under the mattress.

Where the Bard and markets meet

Shakespeare’s plays often turn on the idea of fate. Controlling one’s fate seemed to have become part of the human consciousness by Shakespeare’s time but not yet the competencies to achieve that end. Instead, those who tested fate usually ended up dead. These themes are explored most vividly in The Tragedy of Julius Caesar. Caesar receives all sorts of apparent warning signs, which he ignores, proudly insisting that they point to someone else’s death. Then Caesar is assassinated.

Given the rough start to the year, you may wonder if we made the same mistake as Caesar by ignoring the warning signs. After all, our expectation for a better 2016 (compared to 2015) did not get off to a good start.

What was the trigger for such a panic in January? China, oil and Fed worries were nothing new. The same worries led us to take out portfolio hedges and reduce growth exposure from the second half of 2015 when market complacency was high. While these tail hedging strategies paid off, they were not enough to offset the negative contribution from the exposures to commodities and Asian shares.

As 2015 drew to a close, many of our sentiment and valuation indicators had made a significant positive adjustment (mostly during the August-October correction), macro indicators were showing signs of steady improvement and financial conditions in China were looking up. Then a few people got back to work in early January and listened to interviews by some hedge fund gurus on how China is about to implode and that central banks are out of ammunition. Panic buttons were hit despite the fact these gurus have been making the same predictions ever since the GFC. With markets down sharply, the next group of sellers showed up and decided to sell based on the idea that ‘maybe the market is telling us something’.

4 reasons not to join the panic

For now, major equity indices have found support at key support areas, as markets now focuses on:

While downside selling pressure has shown signs of easing, evidence of buying pressure will need to emerge. Improved earnings prospects against much pessimistic expectations and further policy support from Europe, China, Japan and US (through delayed further rate hikes) should lead to reduced short-term volatility and a re-rating of equities. The most significant risk to market stability, however, continues to be the US dollar.

Final thoughts

Despite the intense market weakness since the start of the year, increasing calls of an imminent global recession and financial meltdown, our focus was and is to remain objective. We continue to expect market turbulence to settle down soon. Further breakdown in emerging market currencies, another bout of underperformance by cyclically-sensitive sectors and falling inflation expectations (pushing real yields higher) will be examples of such dynamics that will warrant a shift in allocation towards a more defensive stance.

About the author
Nader Naeimi, Head of Dynamic Markets at AMP Capital. He is also the portfolio manager of the Dynamic Markets Fund.
Taking your SMSF to the next level
Download now

Sign up to our newsletter!

Receive regular insights and marketing communications including a weekly update of tending news and market insights that are tailored for SMSF trustees and investors.
Sign me up
AMP's Australian operations are bound by the current Australian privacy legislation which outlines how organisations should manage and use personal information collected and held about their customers. AMP Privacy Policy

Thanks for subscribing

Thank you for subscribing to our weekly highlights newsletter.
Your privacy is important to AMP Capital and we are bound by the current Australian privacy legislation. View our privacy policy
Submit and close

Sign up to our newsletter!

Receive regular insights and marketing communications including a weekly update of tending news and market insights that are tailored for SMSF trustees and investors.
AMP's Australian operations are bound by the current Australian privacy legislation which outlines how organisations should manage and use personal information collected and held about their customers. AMP Privacy Policy
Sign me up Not right now. Thanks

Sign up to our newsletter!

Receive regular insights and marketing communications including a weekly update of tending news and market insights that are tailored for SMSF trustees and investors.
AMP's Australian operations are bound by the current Australian privacy legislation which outlines how organisations should manage and use personal information collected and held about their customers. AMP Privacy Policy
Sign me up